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AKIIILAKARNATAKA SAUSKRITA PARISHAT PUBLICATION -14 


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SAMMAARJANEE SHATAKAM 

of 
Asoori Ananthacharya Swami 

Edited with Introduction and Notes 

by 
Prof. Gargeswari Venkatasubbaiah 


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SAMMAARJANEE S1IATAKAM —By Sri Asoori 
Ananihacharya Sw ami, Edited with Lnt rod uciion and notes by 
Prof. Gargcswari Venkmasubbiah . 






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PREFACE 



When I was collecting material for an article on 
Tf^STcT^Jof ^To^?cR h I came across the name of*t*ii*f*u*m=& 
of Melkote Ananthacharya or Anandalwar. When I made 
enquiries about it, I learnt that the author's son was the 
present Peethadhipathi of Yadugiri Yathiraja Matha, 

When I approached His Holiness for a copy of the 
book., he told me that the book had been printed about 90 
years ago and that no copy was available. He, however, 
told me that he would search for a manuscript of the book. 
On my next visit to him he not only handed over a copy 
Of the manuscript (dated 9-1-65), to me, a complete 
stranger, but also asked me to get it printed. He promised 
to meet the cost and immediately gave a cheque to meet 
a part of the printing expenses. I am very grateful to him 
for his kindness and for the trust he placed in me. 

Dr. B.S. Ramakrishna Rao kindly agreed to look 
after the printing and arrange for publication of the honk 
under the auspices of the Akhila Karnataka Samskrita 
Parishat. He also prepared the press copy. 

When I started reading the book. I came across 
many obscure passages in it. When I approached Vidwan 



N. Ranganatha Sharma, the famous scholar and poet, he 
was kind enough to discuss with me and guide me to cull 
out meanings from many of the obscure passages find also 
to make some emendations. In spite of our best efforts, 
we could not make out the meaning of verses 91 and 96 
and the third line in verse 68. These have been marked by 
a question-mark in the text- We have changed a single 
letter in a few stanzas and added 2 missing letters in the 
las) line of the last stanza. In all these cases, the original 
letters have been shown within brackets. I am deeply 
indebted to Vidwan Sharma for his kind help. He had to 
spend many evenings with me for this work. 

In spite pf my best efforts. I could not get a copy of 
the earlier edition. Hence this edition is based solely on 
the manuscript given by the Acharya of Yathiraja Matha. 

It was suggested that an English translation of the 
book may be given. But due to lack of time and also in 
view of the increase in the cost of printing, this could not 
be done. However, on the suggestion of Vidwan Sharma 
short notes have been given, after the text, I hope that 
these would be of some help to the readers. 

I again thank Dr. Rao, for all the trouble he took and 
wish him a long happy and busy life in the cause of 
Samskrila. I express my thanks to Sri Chidambariah. 



II 



himself a lover of Samskrita, and the proprietor of 
Parimala Mudranalaya, for the fine printing and neat 
get-up of the book. 

I hope the lovers of Samskrita will welcome the 
hook and crave their indulgence for any short comings of 
mine, 

"< iaiusha Dhama" Gargeswari Venkafasubbiuh 

20. Second Cross. 9th Main 25-8-9] 

Rajamahal Vilas Extension. {«lle|^l u Ju'lHI'J 
Bangalore -560 080 



ill 



INTRODUCTION 



tRM-flSHd* is a fe^TSFM (Satirical work) 
addressed to the Broom and written with the purpose of 
chastising the persons who transgress the moral code, and 
wicked persons who occupy important official positions, 
solely because they are the favourites of the appointing 
authorities and also to chastise those who appointed them. 

The author of the work, Vidwan Asoori 
Anonthacharya (also known as Anandalvar) was a direct 
descendant, in the male line, of Sri Ramanujacharya T the 
famous Sri Vaishnava Saint. Sri Ramanujacharya had two 
sons, of whom the younger was known as (Pemman) 
Asoori Perumal. Sri Thirumalaeharya. a descendant of 
Asoori Pemmal, migrated to Thiru-Narayanapuram 
(Melkote) and settled in Ramanuja Agrahara, under the 
patronage of Vijayanagara and Mysore rulers. Sri 
Narasimhacharya, a descendant of Sri Thirumalaeharya, 
had three sons, of whom our author was the eldest. 

Sri Anandal war was born on 24- 2- 1 859, He studied 

Veda.Vedanta.SastrasandSahityaattheteetofNatampalli 
Alasingracharya, the then famous Mathadhipnthi of 
Yathiraja Matha and later under the guidance of 



Panditharathnam Kuppannayyangar Swami of Mandaya 
Agrahara. Later on, he passed the Vktwat Pareeksha of 
Sarasvaii Priasaatiifca Mahapothasala of Mysore (the 
present Mysore Samskrita college)* being placed first 
among ?>2 students. It is learnt that he was a tieiUiiJt 
of Maha Vidwan Sosale Ayyasasiri (1854-1934), the son 
of the famous Samskrita schnlar Sri Sosale Garalapuri 
Sastri. 

Ananthaeharya stayed tor sometime at Badarinath 
and on his way back visited Tehri-Garhwal, Bikaner. 
Reva, Bnroda, Thiruvananihapuram and Thanja\ur, 
where he received high honours from the ruiers, 

Alter his return to Mysore, he joined Sadvjdya 
Patfcashala and worked as a S:imskriui Pandita. It is during 
this time that he wrote Sammarjani Sataka. Litter on. he 
also worked as a Panel ita in the Mysore Arehaelogical 
Department, where Sri R. Narasimhacharya was the 
Diret ■ 

He was invited by Maharaja Venkataramana Sim ha 
of Reva to the Akhila Bharatha Vidwat Sabha. where also 
he was honoured. At that time, he was praised by Pandita 
Madana Mohana Malaviya and Lokamanya Bala 

Ganuadhara Tilak. 



VI 



On 11-2-1921, he entered Samnyaasaashramaand 
became the head of Melkote Yathiraja Matha. founded by 
Sri Ramanujacharya, as the 36th Acharya of the 
Pa/ampara. He then made another All India tour and 
returned to Metkote in 1930, after a lapse of 8 years. Some 
renowned scholars like Ramavatara Sarma, Jaiswal and 
Mahamahopadhyayii Hara Prasada Sastri accompanied 
him for some time. 

Sri Anandalwar was conversant with many 
languages including Kannada, Hindi. Tamil and Telugu 
in addition to Samskrita. 

The Acharya wrote and also critically edited many 
Samskrita works. The following were printed and 
published during his life time :- 

Vedanta Works- «fi*llte*W, f^M^tfilft*!, and 
■3^5?ft^ =41^1. 

Pancharatra Agama - W TJftcTT (2 pans), 

^mR #m, *I3*N flftdT and 3TpK^ flf^?TT. 

Kayya, Alankara and Stotra - fRNfftsmi*, 22nd, 
2?rU and 24th chapters of ^TT WSl, SWH*15R, 



VII 



SERlldtes, fi*J1*«W and dMRq*itolfl>L 

He had kept ready for publication his own work 
fcnWSHU** 3rtffJN'tf4w w itfi fteiNAeiKS *jtw and many 
other works. 

The Acharya left this world on 17-5-1943. 

The above biographical details were kindly 
furnished by his son the present Acharya (39(h), of 
Yathiraja Matha, who has made a deep study of Agarnas, 
including Saivagama and also written some books on 
them in Kannada and Telugu. 

The present work commences with two benedictory 
verses. In the first (the unnumbered one}- which perhaps 
is taken trom some other work of the author or may be a 
common H^rlW of many works of his - he praises 
3?W3TFft f^J- In the next verse (no.l), the author 
dedicates himself to the service of Lord wfrjte and 
prays that he (named 3PRT) may be enabled to accomplish 
some thing novel (toft 3?tg^ 3iifl*i1&), 

In verses 2-4, he says that any one visiting the capita I 
of Kamataka (ie Mysore), will experience the different 
temperaments of the people and that in the commotion 
caused by the clash between arrogant people he would 

Vlll 



feel that the unbroken tradition / Vaishnava tradition 
(3igcra3KPB) is almost disappearing, due to lack of 
sincerity, except in the assemblies of men of taste. 

Verses 5-10 form an introduction to the work. Oh 
q*n4ft ! Though many earlier poets composed works on 
subjects like sandals (t|S3t) ? none has written a poem about 
the Broom. So let me write a poem on you. 

Here the diction is not polished, there is no clarity 
of expression or a great scholarly treatment. But the 
greatness of the subject (tilM^!!) covers up these 
shortcomings and makes the work appealing to men of 
laste. (7) 

Some of the -members of the assembly of scholars 
(*K*J), are ignorant and some others are jealous and act 
like deaf-mutes as regards the merits of others. Where can 
my words be welcome? (8) So, you hjj{*5\ alone should 
hear me. Even if my request to you becomes futile, such 
a treatment from a virtuous one, like you, is hetter than a 
fruitful request to unworthy persons. (#) 

Verses 1 1 -23 describe «rr^*ft in various ways, 

O ! *tt4R ! vou never transgress your limit:.. You 
are not made of gold in a king's palace or of human hair 



IX 



in a pour man's house (*m44hu<^ ^ Wt, ^Rsi^As 
'jtsft =fr Fftwft) {verse 11) 

You keep yourself under control, do not desire 
ornaments or good garments. You are not covetous* you 
are indifferent towards joy and sorrow, (Verses 12-15), 
youarea'^kidl. (18) 

You keep yourself under control, donoi desire 
ornaments or good garments. You are not covetous, you 
are indifferent toward* joy and sorrow, (Verses 12-15), 
you are a ^"fcftfl. (18) 

The gfo {yjiu|ift|^3 section of SRfa* Upanishad) 
proclaims that the knowledge of the Supremeexterminates 
all sins, just as the fire, when it comes into contact with 
your reed - cotton (s^qji), destroys it (16) 

Rama made the crow (wmQi) one - eyed and 
Vamana made ^ one - eyed by using the sharp end of 
yours. Who other than thou can vanquish the conceited? 
(21) 

Verses 24-4S glorify *$$%. 

In present day politics, no one knows what will be 
the consequences of his actions. If water- carriers, who 
are thoroughly unqualified for any other job, can be made 



\KII1IA KARNATAKA SW1SKR1IA PAKiNliAT ] f HHU( ATION . U 



# W$t 3H*dMl4 *3#T fefepj 



. .. ,. .... 



SAMMAARJANEE SHATAKAM 

of 
Asoori Ananthacharya Swami 

Edited with Introduction and Notes 

by 

Prof. Gargeswari Venkatasuhbaiah 



H*RT* 



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^f*lft TfilTR TO, ^«jj> - 3 



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3rf^T <fc u lfd<f) H^T <Tf^ 



The beast (*T5JS) who gets honour and titles due to 

his high connections only and not because of merit, and 
those who appoint such persons as presiding officers of 
assemblies deserve to be beaten by you (*tt4*ft) (64) 

A villain, who is a member of an assembly of men, 
though undeserving to be there, is always afraid of being 
beaten by you, when his evil deeds are exposed. As he is 
always thinking of you, Hl44L he will soon assume your 
form, jusi as a worm constantly thinking of a wasp, 
becomes a wasp, (UHttfiW ^TFT- verse 76) 

Verses 85-105 are full of pun (S^FT^and describe 
the broom as the Sun, night, a lion, Saraswati, a 
grammarian, a follower of Kurrmrila Bhatta, mother of 
Physicians, a good astronomer, a Lokayata (srtaiMfi- a 
nastika), a member of T P*TO r f^jfS (Vishnu, Brahma and 
Siva) and a future *tiFQ. 

Verse 92 - Both Panini and yourself are 
*£sfl(&HISKH*M/s and ^TFJ^Kft^'s. Panini is fond of 
Bahuvrihi and Samahara compounds and is an appreciate 
of ^'s and ST^^Ts, You are engaged in collecting many 
grains into heaps and appreciate being bound by a string. 
Thus, you, who are always led by another's hand (HiPiimi) 
have now become a follower of Panini (mftrfl + s^TT) 



XII 



Verses 106-112 are the author's conclusive 
remarks. He wishes that his work may chastise evil men 
and make wise men happy. 

In the last verse (Na 112), he requests ^ft (the 
Broom), with folded hands to cleanse the dust at the top 
of Yadugiri (Melkote) hill, as the Lord Sri Sampath 
Kumara is going around in a procession on the hills and 
also in the purified minds of men. The work ends with the 
words flq^pTs iffffr Sfts {May Vishnu, in the form of 
Sampath Kumara, excel.). 

Most of the Verses {ie. 92) of the Sataka are in 
■^■dfiHfr l metre. The other metres used are *u£<nias£rfed 
(6). *KUh l «d l (4) ; aqgftr li^Mlfa and <JHt1Hll!l*l (2 each) 
STFrf. B$fWr, fflf^, firafMandtf*ft{l each). 

*tf^9Rra5 of ^T3&^IT(who was well known in his 
time as 3# 3frfc« f fo fa), which is a fas«q-wM«i par 
excellence, was very popular among Samskrita scholars 
of Mysore during the middle and last decades of the 19th 
century, as Sri Kutti Sastri (ffeiwil) the commentator of 
the work and a great grandson of the poet, was a respected 
and well - loved figure in the Mysore court and a twlftqilfi 
in the secondquarter of that century. Our aulhormust have 
read the work and taken it as a model for his present work. 



XIU 



In tact, in verse 104. he seems to say. though indirectly 
by pun. that this work of his excels 'tf^5T<T3Jand similar 
a orfc& ('Hft<flVM*lfoB Wti^l X^ 3RPJ). This however is 
a tail claim. 

The work clearly exemplifies the erudite author's 
mastery over Samskrita language and his deep knowledge 
of Sastras. But the meaning of some verses is obscure. 
Recourse to #\*m and f^irhfanRoifH is necessary to 
construe some stanzas. A few verses (Nos, 50, 54. 65, 77 
and 109) verge on the indecent. However, these short- 
comings may be overlooked, because of the good qualities 
of the other verses, some of which are very fine and 
graceful. These drawbacks may be due to the fact that the 
author wrote ihis short poem, whenhewasina very angry 
mood and, perhaps, when he was feeling that some gross 
injustice had been done to him. It seems that he did not 
revise the poem later, when he had cooled down. 

We may. unhesitatingly, say that this yid**!^ is a 
good addition to Samskrita Literature. 



— G. Venkutasubhiali. 



XIV 



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fto&fifcjf*T 17 


JtUHHI 21 

srmt ?roift 22 

HT^t ^T %sft 3 
5TTq*Ts3r "$£Hd*JS 2 




2 


5 







5 

53 

97 

12 
93 
94 
54 
85 
38 
33 
55 
90 
3 



*rer^i 









n 

20 

3 

19 

19 

11 

IS 

8 

7 
12 
19 

I 



MIKIW 

40 
103 

72 



37 

71 

60 

14 

32 

1 

91 

36 

30 






9 

21 



Wf TffcTf 
« « » 



15 

8 

15 

13 

3 

7 

i 

19 

7 



26 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 



Verse No. I. **MI*I*WS *^l*Rs Lakshmi- 
Nrsimha, the presiding deity at Yadugiri Yathiraja Matha. 

2. ci|fr1<h<S contact, feri ftTg TfTf^ and also fef - 

3. W& + i^re, HT^rg Commotion, 3|BJ?T - flWWS 
and also 3f-B^HJHWW8 . 

4. lif^MHls share, H'Wi - Kindred person. The 
meaning ofthe verses 2-4 is nhscure and 3RPT is not clear. 

The intention of the author seems to be to say that- 

Any person who comes into contact with the capital 
of Karnataka, even for a few moments, will experience 
the differing temperaments of its people, like a series of 
waves of the ocean. 

Alas ! In the commotion caused by the clash among 
arrogant men, even though the unbroken 
tradition^Vaishnava tradition manifests itself, it melts 
away like the waves of the ocean (striking againt the coast) 
due to present times, when one is afraid of the 



27 



disappearance of sincerity. Bui, as this tradition is very 
strong, it never disappears completely, among kindred 
people. Especially in the assemly of learned men, this 
tradition Is expressed by men of tasie in an 
indescribable way. 

5. y*RT good composition. The two halves of Ibis 
verse are separate sentences. 

6. 3lxf ■ praiseworthy. *&%% *TT?p Sandal. Shoe, 

7. tfrf*^ polish, clarity, gf^ beauty. dRlHM 3TSFI 
(lit Casting away levity) overshadowing the defects (of 
the composition)* ' 

12, Sq^TS lonely place. 

16. qWflfafil* Knowledge of the Supreme (TO). 
ftRfafaKfMI freedom from doubt. ^*^H soft fibres of 
reed, reed-cotton, cf. rt«lWl*l^j1HiJ M W^M STPJ ^ 
<TFTH$ SI^T A *$&& teiHii^ ^B?r (Chantlogya 
Upanishad 5-24-3). 

23. *W»i8 a Kind of coarse grass* 

25. f?TWJ a loop of rope (Kannada - Neiu). 

27. f#T and $-#I($S = earth). 

ix. ^ffte - dried grass for animal feed • 



28 



2s>. clMf = ^IH«ft r *fa3>8 eye of a peacock's tail. 

30. £iq<^ = a kind of scent- bearing grass (Manithi 
^m t Kannsda Jjf^fF dS) mPQt pendent, f^THS Canopy- 

35, <affl<g (m,f) Sweeper, also purifier of a villain. 

43, ^cir licentious woman, harlot, also dusty 
ground ; Hig ?Tn% ^ft ^tg^IT = *tt^ft 

The first half is one sentence. 

When u man marries u harlot, against the advice of 
his well wishers, the H^nii is observed by holding her 
*tff{not J#T.) ^m r WHMRite*IH«$Rl for qtgpfT: tor ^Ht F 

44. iiiqflfliRaes observance of many rituals. 
46. fe§FT = sprinkling, 

49. ji^h^ci = not appreciated, ^t^cfcfcj for lowly 
persons. 

50, tes TfrrgM^rs wmz (mvm) w^ts tararcns 

52. wflVs Sharp instrument. 
56, foT^fo* obstructs, obscures , 



29 



62. Q\«m is required here to make sense. Hl4w 

64.. S^^IS = W3*$Z relationship. 
66, dletatt dust. 

68. The meaning of third line cannot be made out, 

69. *rs ara fo$ (<ro) ^feis. ftl^l pseudo-ascetic, 
person who wears fSwfillJf. 

There was a tussle between vfftwM's and 4t{J)eTs 
over religious observances at the Mysore palace. This 
might be the author's reaction to this tussle. Verses 3 and 
4 may also have a reference to this tussle, 

■Jta-fttM-tdf " %<m fl*MHdl * or %pfas - 

70. m <3m*\ *g. The first half of the stanza may be 
construed as WT W £P?FT ^4H^ft ffrT 3TT3PT "RFlft 

73. First half may be construed nsviHMGS 3^S fi^^l^ 
Here M is used in the sense of interrogation. 



3€ 



3THT?nr[ 3R3TOT iftWfiBIT m^JT ?ft. BwffcklH, - 3?^ 

74. ^rWT is £FJ5^T; &$g<&m = Stiff - necked. 

75, SffatflR^fn Wtim i.e. SlfeF + 3fft 

78. *jfrTS = J'N^hl Stinking . 

79, MfufedRifij-it ^ais mi g?raT *r g^rrs 

81. ffl*l {m t n) a lucky moment . 

SfF^fRTSFTS one who has got an opportunity at a lucky 
moment. 

82. f^J *T% - f*Fu%S = fate of a well born 
person HtuMtmfr, f-4k'ffcIS - fate of one who clings to 
the earth. 5TJ^S Sharp ends. (of HT^Wt). 

87. ^RTs ?q^ for WW, awdtWOTl for <fl3fcft. 

^Tcl + flRfci + ^J for iffisHt ^ (3TPTC*!) belongs to the 
OT^ta subgroup of yift 1 !*? and hence fa^ is optional. 
So ^T% and qnqfif are alternative forms (fewcbl^). 
TO! (covering) is m^\ of mg without frr^l Vidwan 
Sharma opines that cl-teRl*^ is a better reading, 

89. 3iN 3RtWH*f and site ^M J l f-f^ for PtTJ 
^f^^dl and Hl4«fi' respectively. 



31 



<W. iyi^-^sra = according 10 a plan, for ^ and 
^rft; being bound by a fibre for Hl4-ft. #^ battle, 
association, £>rt) = wise person. 3TSnPWflT not following 
3TTW for ^fr and not having a 5TO for *TZ 91TCJ one who 
controls, 9TTM ^T! - 9lM%tTT. m^ft's Tjf^ (movement) is 
dependent on the person who uses it. 

91. cTfecT, WW and f^f are technical terms in 
grammar. In spite d£ our best efforts, we could not make 
out me meaning of the stanza, 

92- miPiR is engaged in application of rules of 
3§&fe and flWTT (SF5 and ft^tHFjHt is engaged in 
collecting many grains of corn into heaps. 

M|pJ|^ appreciates *J5T and $33% TT^ft is 
appreciative of being tied by a string, as if there is no 
string, it ceiisestoexist. MlPlPHl ^?TT u#Mf itcT! ^T mfapftcTT. 
The *ftffi\ has become a follower of MfPlft. 

93- ^Tlft, RTFTCf, tfTSjfefe are technical terms of 
^W^Stfl^cfi school of philosophy. Although Hl44l is 
connected with these terms (though in a different sense), 
people do not call her <ffl"Pjuft ie. follower of ^TR the 
expounder of ^stffo. 

The meaning of first 3 lineS as applied to Hl-rf-ft is 

clear. 



32 



94, The first halt" of the verse refers to the *Tlf 
interpretation of Mimamsa Doctrine about ^ffrfrri. 

As regards Hpfcft, the construction is gdlHI^ ^n# 

because the power of 4|vf-ft would he useless, hy itself 
on the path (while sweeping it), unless it is applied hy 
another person, therefore, 

95 , ^Tn%^ one who is eager ^rf^HWITS, 3T^ft (TPT) 

Jmfa, "jm^jJki \jtoI<si are names of <3ir<i<ftK 's. But it is nol 
possible to make out the meaning of this stanza. 

98. $&*{ = %£S, Hl?l%v1 WS - adverse action of cTTrT 
one of the three humours of the body, according to4l|4£cfcl 
fiWT *ffg is a f^9h*f of flH^. f^R§ disease. 
^5-^TT3"ft*K"*n^l There are seven sififs essential 
elements of the hotly, according to ■3fTgsfe. (tilMRd 5Rhs 
= mercury preparation. These are as applied to faq^l 



The meanings as applied to qfcMl are clear. In 
miff's case 3§VT g fefiTC *ff§. ?fo#rT 5T#TS = forceful 
action (?) 



33 



99. f^R^ dimension of the earth, measuring or 
computing the movements of the earth. <rcJi(flR^r i 3R5fRS 
a wretched astronomer Tft ^R fe different planets and 
weekdays. For I !#ft, TJ^TK^s = different types of grip. 

103. 3*fa^ increase for ¥^T; cutting for T^ and 

104. qfWt31?l*filf^! W^I B V tm ^ he seems (0 
indicate, indirectly, that this work of his excels qf%*ftM4> 
of ^^TC, an excellent fts^H*!^ (satirical work). If 
so, it is a very tall claim. qiodsjqT had the title 

yAwiftui'MlH. 

105. qffriffi arcg^ffl ^ 

108. sftfe = mean (?) fqlt^f = agitated. 3H^£ = 
unselfish. 

109. 35q1% seems to be WlHlfefe. It should be 3^ 
= make noise. 

1 10. <frWJ3W Eastern whirlwind. During the 50 
years of Commissioner's rule of Mysore, a large number, 
of officers in Madras service were appointed to high 
offices of Mysore State. These officers did not allow 
Mysorean officers to get their due places. The author 
seems to be The author seems to be referring to this. 



34 



111. ^jcTS bastard. Many persons have blackened 
themselves by waiting at the doors of bastards, wishing 
to be benefited by them. If any one among them starts 
sweeping the roads of q^RiR, a favourite of T^n^T, he 
wilJ reach the top of the three worlds, (attain salvation). 

112. ni %kf)^. nH is used in the sense of well 
known. The deity presiding at the famous ^g^TTTFJ^ 
temple of <t$R]R (Melkote) is called Chelvapiliai (in 
Tamil) or TOJW. Instead of 4iM<$HK, UHriJd has been 
used here, m^ct = fcM*l^ excels. 

NOTE 

1. In many places, instead of the literal meaning, a 
meaning near to it, suitable to the context, has been given. 

2. often 'JTRR and f=THfihR|i|Rw had to be 
resorted to. Co make sense of the stanzas. 

3. The explanations given above, are mainly based 
on the discussions I had with Vidwan Ranganatha 
Sharrna, 



o © o 



35 




v^ 



1'iijf, GarggesWllli Venkula«.iH>lii;ih 
Bom la L9Q9, Prof. Cargeswari WcofeBtasubhiah graduated 
in W2S from ihe University of Mysore Budyirtg s 
Mathematics and Experimental Psychology. In 1930 and 1932, be 
obtained his M.A. (Maths) and B.T. Degrees, First an Associate of 
toe Institute of Actuaries (AIA), London (N39), he subsequently 
became a Fellow then (FIA), He is a Fellow of Royal 
Statistical Society, 1 oodon and a few other Organisati 

He uiughi in n High School lor u few years ;md became the 
Professor of Actuarial Science and Statisitt> ai Brihan Maharashtra 
College of Commerce, Punt [ 1945-56], Alter retirement from Lit' 
of India, he has been sen/ingasacoitstilimg Actuary^ Bangalore, 

Prof. Vfenkatasubbfflh is an erudite Scholar in Sanskrit and 
KanmidaalKO, Among his u^mlatioosare.Snori storiesofOr. Masti 
v L 'nLi[">h.,i Iyengar (Into Sanskrit), Btiartrbarrs S&kyapadiya (tola 
Kanrwda] and Mahisha Shataka [into English). 



Roya! court officers why not the sweepers, who are 
equally incompetent? (25) 

I TPfft f You abandon your present body made 
of reeds and acquire one of peacock's feathers. The rulers 
will then, tit; you up in golden ihreads, give you a different 
name and also honour you with a title. If only your body 
had a sweet scent, people would have used you as pendants 
from their canopies. (29.30) 

Why have the sages who have prescribed tn*si4R 
and many other observances for the atonement of sins, 
not prescribed your beatings as one of the observances ? 

(47) 

How is it that no one, who has prescribed that fan, 
sandals, clothes and umbrella are to he given as gifts on 
certain occasions, has included you the destroyer of 
dust/sin (**[§). in the list of such articles? (48) 

In stanzas 49-84, the author prescribes belabouring 
with a broom (" i ii*KI<ii5''i)asa punishment to persons who 
transgress certain moral codes or commit social offences. 
He is particularly harsh on incompetnnt officials, whose 
only qualification to hold important positions is that they 
are the relatives cir favourites of officers appointing them, 
and also on the officers who appoint such persons. 



XI